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Thanks to Julie Hester letting me know about a very coronation day specific bluebell reference I have updated my post to include the first verse of 'The Bluebell Fairy' by Cicely Mary Barker. Thanks, Julie!

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A lovely read and visual feast for a spring morning. (I’m increasingly convinced that you live in an Enid Blyton book.)πŸ’™

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I was able to transplant a few from one patch to another area. I hope they will spread there too. Slowly I take it from your article. Forty years in a deciduous wooded wetlands area some Bluebells have taken over in two areas. Old flowerbeds. They are beautiful.

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Gorgeous photos throughout! The one in the woods is magical ... hovering purple mist πŸ’œ

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Ah the photos - bluebells are just glorious aren’t they. We have some that come up under a bench in our front garden. I painted it cream a few years back and I keep the seeds from the bluebells once they’ve gone to seed knowing they take at least 3/4 years to flower. πŸ₯°

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Gorgeous photos. I'm recalling my (American) daughter's early obsession with the Flower Fairies books, and just looked up the Bluebell Fairy. Here on coronation day it's perhaps appropriate:

My hundred thousand bells of blue,

The splendour of the Spring,

They carpet all the woods anew

With royalty of sapphire hue;

The Primrose is the Queen, ’tis true.

But surely I am King!

Ah yes,

The peerless Woodland King!

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May 6Liked by Rebecca Holden

Such a delight, Rebecca! As I read, I could actually smell the blue bells. I have so many fond memories of walking through the Galloway forest and the cool, perfumed air. The little close-up photo is so sweet -- their little Bluebell slumped shoulders and shy drooping heads. This was a perfectly sequenced article, with commentary, nostalgia, bits from science and history and literature. You brought it all together so beautifully. Thanks for the inspiration of both subject matter and excellence in writing.

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I love bluebells and could feel myself relaxing as I read your beautifully written, wonderfully illustrated and informative post.

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This was wonderful to read!! Thank you for writing it so well and for the delightful photos!!! πŸ’™πŸ’™πŸ’™

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"The Bluebell" poem was a divine gift. Thank you for sharing, Rebecca. These images look like a slice of heaven.

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Thank you for so many wonderful photos today. Your post today made me smile...Spring is here! :)

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This was beautiful. You also reminded me of Cassandra in I Capture the Castle, talking about the bluebells in an English spring.

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Such a beautiful string of images. I've never walked through a bluebell wood and can only imagine the scent and swathe of beauty.

But my preference is actually for the wood anemone. I'm currently nurturing white wood anemones in my own garden - not easy, but if I manage to pull it off, I'll be thrilled and I'll think of this glorious newsletter as part of the inspiration.

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May 7Liked by Rebecca Holden

Great post! Love bluebells and their gentle fragrance. We're lucky to have a wood behind us that is filled with them - a three minute walk and we're surrounded. There's something about the peace of a bluebell wood that can't be found anywhere else. Great photos, too - thanks for this!

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What a lovely tribute to this native flower. I love that the forest carpets are ancient and have taken centuries to establish. That does make them sort of magical.

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May 7Liked by Rebecca Holden

Interesting to know that Australian bluebells are Spanish! Definitely unscented, but very pretty and happy to slowly expand their place in my cottage garden. What a delightful read. Thanks so much dear Rebecca.

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